Prophetic Names: Trees

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I’m loving the themes that come out of this research.  There are some pretty common names and some pretty common meanings, but prophetically two names can have different connotations depending on the individual.  That’s what makes names so beautiful.  They’re uniquely and perfectly: YOU.

I’ve noticed a trend that I wanted to dig a little deeper into.  Some names that I’ve come across have references to trees.  I might do a series on all the names that mean “person who lives near” or “dweller by” because those show up a lot too.  But some names are actually taken from not just trees, but very specific trees.  These are ones you’d notice, that people would study, and that have particularly defining traits.

So I did some research into the botanical descriptors of some of these trees and prayed into what I found and…whoa…it’s some rich stuff.  As we study names, we can’t just take “from the Ash tree” at face value.  There’s some prophetic purpose for that tree.  Let me show you what I mean.

Ashley Nicole Musick

Ashley is somewhat simple: “from the Ash Tree”.  (Thought you’d like to hear that “ash” could also be translated from its etymology as “spear”).  Many names have something to do with locations and strategic landmarks.  The “Ash Tree” was probably a place that people recognized and knew that a certain family or individual lived there. The wood of the Ash tree is both strong and elastic.  People choose to use Ash on purpose for a variety of things.  In fact, they specifically noted in some articles I read that Ash is used to make musical instruments.  It was interesting to hear this comment though: you don’t use Ash wood on outdoor furniture because being left outside will corrode away and rot the wood.  The Ash is used on the inside, for precious things, useful things, in the places where people live and under a rooftop and covering.  You are a woman who thrive under covering, who finds life by being included and valued…and you are.

Lindsey Meghan Heston

Lindsey comes from “the linden tree near the water.”  It’s a beautiful picture and may be just that, but I wanted to look into why the linden tree is important.  The linden has a strong (yet flexible) trunk, heart-shaped leaves, it grows rapidly in rich soil and can grow incredibly old.  Where do I even begin!? Strong, secure foundation, the “heart” and passion are visible and keep reproducing, the environment has a lot to do with its health, and it’s meant for longevity.  The wood of the linden was used in making Viking shields but also for sculptures.  Here’s the part I liked best though: linden is used medicinally against restlessness, headaches and hysteria.  It’s soothing, at its DNA it’s meant to bring peace (it’s the tree “near the water”…kind of like Psalms 23, “He leads me beside quiet waters”).  Quite the charge eh?  There’s a vulnerability to the linden, it’s actually incredibly susceptible to insect attacks but at the same time, makes excellent honey when near beehives.  It’s resilient and makes the best of its weaknesses.  It’s an unabashed, beautiful tree.

Lauren Anne Williamson

Lauren means “from the place of the laurel trees.”  Laurels have been used throughout history in a variety of ways, but some of the most notable include the Greeks and Romans who used them as crowns to victors of various games (like the Olympics).  There are sayings that use “laurel” as way to talk proverbially about patience or a reflection on the past.  The laurel itself however, is a beautiful tree.  Its flowers are pretty but are highly defensive.  The laurel has a protection mechanism in its beauty; the flowers are poisonous.  But get this: the flowers are poisonous so as to prevent inbreeding.  The flowers force the insects and pollen to go out instead of re-pollinating familiar areas or even itself.  It’s healthier when this happens.  The laurel thrives in humid environments, which I found intriguing.  If you’ve ever been in places of high humidity, you can’t help but notice the presence of the water in the air.  Think of this spiritually, are you one who thrives when the spirit is thick?

Robert Ellery Riggs Jr

Ellery was surprisingly easy to find (I’d never heard the name before).  It comes from the “Elder tree” where we get “elderberries” (and for your Harry Potter buffs, the “elder wand”).  I did some research into the elder tree and came out with some interesting notes.  The berries and flowers are used in a variety of ways.  Elderberries are used in jams and syrups.  They’re incredibly sweet and nutritious.  The stalks, however, are poisonous and are used in the manufacture of cyanide.  The stalks protect the plant and the fruit it produces so the plant can produce more fruit.  The fruit is freely given and taken away but the foundation is firm, strong and guarded.  The nutritious and poisonous live side by side.  It takes maturity to know the uses and best management of both.

I’m in the process of trying to reply to all of your comments.  This has been so rewarding, thank you for sharing your names with me.  If you still want to throw your name in for prophetic consideration, just leave a comment (full legal name, no commentary).

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